Special needs

We have rescued many dogs that have tested positive for heart worm. It is very important that you give your dogs heartworm preventative every month and have your vet test for heartworm in the spring of the year. Heartworm is a potentially fatal condition. It only takes one bite from an infected mosquito for a dog to get heartworm.
We have five dogs that need to be treated for heartworm and one that needs to have knee and hip surgery. If you would like to donate to the medical needs of these dogs please mail your check to:
Puppy Love Rescue
Attn: Medical fund
3588 Townline Road
West Bend, WI 53095
 
Rusty, waiting at UW Hospital for another heart worm treatment.
 
 Rusty came to Puppy Love Rescue (PLR) from a kill shelter in NC pregnant and her babies were born in a foster home. Rusty and her babies were loved and well taken care of, but in spite of that, only one baby survived.
She arrived in Wisconsin the evening of January 11, and we realized Rusty was extremely sick within the first thirty minutes of having her. At the emergency veterinarian in Grafton, it was determined that Rusty had an overload of heartworms obstructing her main arteries into the heart so blood could not get to her kidneys and liver. Her eyes and gums were yellow and her breathing was labored.
The doctor determined that there were two options: we could have her put to sleep or she would need major surgery that would cost $6,000 - $7,000.
It was determined surgery would happen to save her; the money would have to come from some place. Immediately we began spreading the word and the need for help.
Rusty was moved to the UW Madison Vet Hospital, where she
received a blood transfusion and medications to balance her electrolytes.
Rusty came through surgery great; they had to go through her jugular to have the worms removed. However, not all the worms were removed, and Rusty has about 8-9 months of recovery ahead of her.
She will have months of ongoing care and will have her follow up treatment for heartworms.
She had been confined to a crate with limited movement. Since then, Rusty has made such great improvements. The Cardiologist gave permission for her to spend time outside of her crate! She has gained a few pounds and is full of love.
Rusty still has a long battle ahead of her but she is a fighter.
Through the help of many we have managed to raise $2,700 towards Rusty’s medical bills but we still have a long way to go. 
You can help by donating for Rusty’s recovery: 
Please PayPal it to gooddogsathome@yahoo.com every $1 counts.
 If we can pay off Rusty’s bills, we can save more dogs
 
 
 
  

How Heartworm Happens: The Life Cycle

First, adult female heartworms release their young, called microfilariae, into an animal's bloodstream. Then, mosquitoes become infected with microfilariae while taking blood meal from the infected animal. During the next 10 to 14 days, the microfilariae mature to the infective larval stage within the mosquito. After that, the mosquito bites another dog, cat or other susceptible animal, and the infective larvae enter through the bite wound. It then takes a little over 6 months for the infective larvae to mature into adult worms. In dogs, the worms may live for up to 7 years. Microfilariae cannot mature into adult heartworms without first passing through a mosquito.

Hank is a large dog and he loves to play. He loves chew toys but especially anything that squeaks. Hank gets along with cats and other dogs and is crate trained. His favorite thing in the world is to roll around and gallop in the back yard. He gives kisses and has lots of love to give! He would be a wonderful addition to any family! Hank is heartworm positive and is being treated. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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